Monday, 3 April 2017

Why it's a good idea to create a style guide for your game


So my players aren't super enjoying the current 5e campaign. I'm running Storm King's Thunder, the first time I've run a full pre-written campaign and my group has made it clear that they're not getting a tonne out of it.

My first reaction was to be downbeat about it. I'm my own worst critic and I just felt deflated. Was I not being a good DM? Should I have already known my group wasn't enjoying it? Mopey Scott came out to play.

Eventually I got over it and reasoned that they missed my homebrew campaigns, so actually this wasn't a big a deal as I was making out. Plus, I could see where they were coming from. I hadn't really stopped to consider what kinds of games the group likes. I'm aware of how each of them likes to play in a game (one is a big roleplay fan while another much prefers problem solving and combat). But I didn't think that they would be against a sandbox game - it's just simply out of their comfort zone.

This brings me to the style guide. One of my players suggested it and it's a great idea. We have a Google Doc that we've all fed into that goes through the kinds of games, campaigns, encounters and pacing we all like. It's a live document that we can all refer to when running a game and I know it's going to be super helpful. Now I know my players don't want to have to roleplay travelling, and they love meaningful quests tied to their characters. This is all good stuff to know when I'm prepping, so I'd highly recommend you and your group creates your own style guide.