Thursday, 12 March 2015

So much universe and so little time - thank you, Sir Terry


Words can't express how I felt when the news of Sir Terry Pratchett's death found its way to my feed reader. It wasn't a complete shock - the author had famously suffered from early onset of Alzheimer's - but when I saw that headline I just stopped in my tracks. Even though he was afflicted by such a debilitating disease, somehow he always seemed immortal to me.

Sir Terry had always been a fixture in my life. I remember when I was in my third year of primary school and we had reading time on the beige carpet. I would always toddle over to the book shelf and pick up either The Carpet People, Wings, Diggers or Johnny and the Bomb. At that age I didn't care who the author was - but I knew I loved the characters, the settings and the humour. I lapped up the humour.

Through primary school and into high school I discovered more Pratchett in the Discworld series. The first Discworld book I owned was Reaper Man, a present from my mum and step-dad, the latter being the one who really introduced me to Ankh-Morpork and its surrounding areas. Soon I would be devouring as many books as I could: Wyrd Sisters, Carpe Jugulum, The Colour of Magic, The Fifth Elephant. I couldn't get enough.

Much later I would write Halberd Fantasy Roleplaying - a love-letter to Pratchett and his world. I also discovered that Sir Terry shared my interest in folklore, which somehow brought us closer together (in my mind, unfortunately I never had the opportunity to meet him). I did, however, have the opportunity to gush about his work on his publisher's site, so at least that's something.

Sir Terry Pratchett has inspired me and thousands of others over his amazing career as a writer. He was one of the most hard-working authors of a generation and dazzled millions with his wit and charming characters, and he will continue to do so. Maybe he is immortal after all.

Thank you for everything, Terry. It's an embuggarance that you had to leave so soon.

"Death isn't cruel - merely terribly, terribly good at his job." - Sourcery, Terry Pratchett.