Friday, 15 February 2019

Moving forward with the OSR


Let's get one thing clear: Zak is not the OSR. Though nobody can deny the impact and influence he's had on the OSR, this is in the past. I've seen some people proclaim that the OSR is now essentially dead in the water. That innovation is over and it's time to move on.

I simply don't believe this is true.

The community is as important as it's ever been. It's as innovative as its ever been. Look at Luka Rejec's Ultraviolet Grasslands (Exalted Funeral Press) and tell me that's not an exciting slice of fried gold. Look at Black Pudding (Random Order Creations). This year Romance of the Perilous Land will be the first OSR game from Osprey Games, owned by Bloomsbury.

The imminent closure of Google Plus has ignited a resurgence in the blogosphere. Without a centralised community, we've become nomadic, moving from blog to blog conversing, challenging and celebrating. This is a visionary community, one that will move forward with positivity. There are thoroughly decent people doing thoroughly decent things and this should continue.

Not only will the OSR survive - it will thrive.

8 comments:

  1. Wait, Osprey is publishing RotPL?!? Details, please?

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    Replies
    1. Muhaha. I'll be doing a full post on it when I can.

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    2. Yeah, Osprey moved into skirmish wargaming a few years ago and have some interesting titles out there. Almost like historical monographs to borrow an academic term. "Outremer: Faith & Blood." "Gaslands." "Ronin." "A World Aflame." Etc.

      RotPL seems like a good fit. I was wondering when they were going to get an RPG title.

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  2. Hear, hear! And to be perfectly fair, Zak's plummet and exit from the scene has brought some people (including me and at least two other people) back into actually being engaged again. Things can pretty much only get better from here.

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  3. I won't speak for the OSR in general but I will for myself. Zak, among many others, has had zero influence on me and my way of gaming. So I'll deny his impact with no reservations whatsoever.

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  4. Links to those blogs mentioned would be a nice addition to this site! Personally I'm removing myself from a lot of social media (I'll problably still use Twitter though) as I prefer blogs and forums. This guy Zak, well as a Swede I don't know much about him, but probably his name is in some of the stuff I own and play (D&D 5e for example). A community will not die just because one person falls off. It might change and in this case I guess, from what I know of his past actions, to the better.

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  5. Zak was not the OSR. I will argue though that his rise (not his fall) was one of the early signs that the movement was going off the rails.

    I say this not as a (minor) content creator, but simply as a gamer, consumer, and observer who witnessed the birth of the OSR and followed it from the beginning: my own interest in the OSR is inversely proportional to the popularity of artpunk and micro-game alternatives to D&D. This phenomenon is what closed the door on the OSR for me.

    LogoGate latched it behind me, and the Crimes of Zak have merely twisted the lock.

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